Notice your friends holding something back? In our Sinica podcast for today, we talk about the self-censoring phenomenon that's taken root among the foreign community in China, and discuss a surprising case which demonstrates exactly the opposite: how one of the fiercest critics of Mao's legacy has emerged within the confines of China's own educational system. Why is one Chinese teacher going where most foreigners fear to tread, and what does this mean for those of us working and living in China?

After a successful speaking trip to Australia, Kaiser Kuo is back in the studio hosting Sinica this week. He is joined by Jeremy Goldkorn of Danwei fame and Sinica regular Gady Epstein, Beijing bureau chief for Forbes magazine. Joining us as a first time guest is David Moser, translator, essayist and Sinologist who is currently working as the Academic Director for CET Beijing.

If you enjoy this podcast, be sure to share your thoughts in the comments section, or by writing us at sinica@popupchinese.com. And remember, to subscribe to the Sinica show through RSS, just open up iTunes, click on the "Advanced" menu and select the option "Subscribe to Podcast". When prompted, copy the URL http://popupchinese.com/feeds/custom/sinica into the box. If you'd like to download this mp3 directly from our site you can also grab it as a standalone mp3 file. Enjoy!
 said on
May 21, 2010

And here are the links to the articles mentioned in this podcast.

Xujun Eberlein, "After Four Decades, Apologies are Coming Forth"

http://www.insideoutchina.com/2010/05/after-four-decades-apologies-are-coming.html

Ann Condi, "Changing the Subject: How the Chinese Government Controls Television

http://www.danwei.org/tv/selfcensorship_the_2000_pound.php

Emily D. Parker, "Censors Without Borders" (NYT)

http://www.nytimes.com/2010/05/16/books/review/Parker-t.html

Richard McGregor, "China's Private Party"

http://online.wsj.com/article/SB10001424052748704250104575238590027868792.html

Gady's piece doesn't seem to be up yet....
 said on
May 21, 2010
Yang Rui, man that guy is stiffer than a 5 week old McDonald's French Fry.

@Kaiser, you ever try and get Yang Rui to go out for drinks after a taping of "Dialogue"?

 said on
May 21, 2010
anyone know where we can watch yun tong feis speech?
 said on
May 21, 2010
Jeremy nails one important point, I think: the Great Leap Forward is relatively safe for discussion, while the CR, because there are still people living and serving in government today, is considerably further out on the margins.
 said on
May 21, 2010
@marksakarassen You can just do a search on YouTube for 袁腾飞 and you'll find tons of them.
 said on
May 21, 2010
I remember distinctly that article on media that David Moser wrote under a (female) synonym.

And how Jeremy rebuked a friend of mine once ("the Chinese don't really care about it") for making an issue about freedom of the press.

I saw that SARS press conference, was living in Xaimen in the time. It was a defining moment in my incentive to move to Beijing. The other was just getting out of Xiamen.
 said on
May 22, 2010
Let 100 flowers bloom
 said on
May 22, 2010
Folks, Gady Epstein's piece about Richard McGregor's new book (The Party) is now online. Please check it out!

http://www.forbes.com/2010/05/21/china-communist-party-god-book-opinions-contributors-beijing-dispatch.html
 said on
May 25, 2010
Is there any information we can read on the Beijing apartheid that was talked about?
 said on
May 25, 2010
sambowden:

See China Heritage Quarterly, by Geremie Barmé

http://www.chinaheritagequarterly.org/editorial.php?issue=012

Money quote below, between dotted lines.

The segregation referred to went on from the mid 1600s until the second half of the 1800s.

It's remarkably similar to my experience of white suburban Johannesburg in the 1970s and 80s, although in Joburg black people who has a special "pass" could stay the night in what we used to call servant's quarters attached to a white-owned house.

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With the fall of the Ming dynasty in 1644 and the establishment of the Qing dynastic capital of the Manchu ruling family in Beijing, the city underwent a major transformation. In 1648, an imperial expulsion order (yi cheng ling 移城令) forced the Han-Chinese residents out of the Inner City to live in the Outer City (Wai Cheng, also known in English as the Chinese City) of the capital. Although Han were allowed into the Manchu enclave during the day, at night before the city gates were closed they were required to return to the southern suburbs. The Inner City was given over to the jurisdiction of the Manchu imperial clans and the military Eight Banners under which the Manchus organized themselves. Within these areas princes were allocated residences according to individual rank and merit, often displacing Ming-era occupants from their grand homes.

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I am also referred by wiser counsel that I (and perhaps you) need to read "basic works on the Qing by Evelyn Rawski and others".
 said on
June 20, 2010
Great pun, Jeremy. These podcasts are great and I will be looking forward to more.

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